Gluten intolerance is MUCH more common than you think

Gluten intolerance and underlying gluten sensitivity causes inflammation in the gut lining – This can damage the small intestine resulting in malabsorption of nutrients which can lead to serious health problems.

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, oats and barley based foods. Wheat however seems to cause the most problems as it is generally eaten more than the other grains. A gluten intolerance (even a mild one) can damage the lining of the small intestine causing bloating and damage to the gut and affects absorption of nutrients.

The lining of the gut can also become porous due to constant irritation and inflammation (leaky gut syndrome) Tiny breaches in the lining may allow gluten molecules to pass through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream, activating the immune system and causing autoimmune health problems. This can affect children too.

In general only those that are diagnosed with celiac disease (severe gluten intolerance) set out to avoid all products with wheat in. But even if you do not have celiac disease you can still be affected by intolerance to wheat it just may not be so obvious. If you suspect wheat intolerance or want to just give your system a break, then try cutting out wheat products like bread, pasta and pastries. By cutting right back you may find relief from your symptoms.

Consult a nutritional therapist for food sensitivity testing. At FoodSpa I use the most advance Cellular Allergen test done in a specialised laboratory that will test accurately 111 foods from a normal diet – it is a full blood test tracking immune markers caused when the body mounts an attack triggered by food particles in the body. This can cause many conditions and is really worth knowing. A good therapist will give practical advise as to how to replace everyday wheat or gluten products.

Please Note: If you do have severe digestive symptoms please contact your GP/health practitioner and get it checked.


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